They are back !

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We can confirm that the bird we have been watching since Good Friday is KL !  Today she was joined by her mate, the un-ringed male.  They have been mating throughout the day and are holding territory over their nest.

So….we are up and running, ‘phew !  Just an additional  note, we are currently recruiting for two new members of staff to join the team, if you are interested you can apply at www.forestry.gov.uk/vacancies or via direct.gov.uk .

Finally, a special thanks must go to Becky and Barbara, along with the team of volunteers for holding the fort until we fill the vacant posts !

V0 reaches Africa

V0 left Europe and crossed the Gulf of Cadiz, entering the African continent just West of Casablanca in Morocco.  He then travelled SW, migrating through Western Sahara, Mauritania and eventually into Senegal.  His latest position is in an estuarine area inland from the coast.

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V0 is on the way

We have just got the latest set of maps from V0’s tracker and he’s off !

He left the nest site and headed S/SW passing over Morecambe Bay, Cheshire, West of Birmingham, over Bristol, Bath and then crossed the Channel at Weymouth, entering France via Northern Brittany.

He then embarked on an epic 12 hour crossing of the Bay of Biscay, landing in Northern Spain, just West of Santander….here he rested for a day.

The course he took then was over the Northern Spanish mountains, at one point flying at over 2000m, then into Portugal through the Guarda region before meeting the coast at Comporta then heading South to the Algarve region and his last information was from near Villa Nova de Milfontes.

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Turtle takes the Plunge

One of our staff team, Christina Turtle was recently married to her long term partner Mark Cardwell in a very personal and moving ceremony in the South Lakes.  Christina has been with the LDOP since 2007, and returned in many guises after breaks to work abroad, complete her MSc, and go travelling around Europe.  Whatever her role has been, she has always shown an infectious passion for ospreys and wildlife, and inspired, quite literally, tens of thousands of visitors to support our work.  All the staff and volunteers at the project wish Christina and Mark the very best wishes for their future life together.10528366_10152372656830687_409799985755116025_o

Worrying Developments

Sorry for the lack of updates over the last few days, but we have some worrying news from the nest.  Over the weekend, initially one chick, then another became ill.  We have taken advice from a vet, and it is suspected that two of the chicks are suffering from some kind of infection.  We are very concerned, and will keep monitoring the chicks health and let you know how things progress.

Today is the Day

A hatch! We saw our first osprey chick of the season hatch between 7 &7.30 this evening.  Both KL and the male had been changing their behaviour today and we thought at one point we may have seen some pipping in one of the eggs…..we then convinced ourselves not….but we were actually right, and here is the evidence.  Welcome to the world little osprey !

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The End of a Chapter

Today we removed the infrastructure from nest 1 in Wythop forest.  Ospreys bred here in 2001, they were an unringed male and a Scottish female, and were the first pair of ospreys to breed successfully in the Lakes for 150 years.  They heralded the start of the re colonisation of England by ospreys after being persecuted to extinction in the 1800’s.  After the birds stopped using the site in 2009, moving to another location, the site has been unoccupied, and we have now removed the cables, sensors and cameras due to enable essential forest management work.  Our hope is that after the work, this site will again become desirable to ospreys, and we once again see birds using this iconic site in Wythop forest.IMG_0920

Easter Egg time

After a couple of weeks of courting, displaying and mating, the time is nigh for KL to lay her clutch.  Today she has spent lots of time at the nest, rearranging, digging and taking much of the material the male brings in.  The nest is superb, the cup seems ready, so soon… very soon, we should welcome our first egg.

KL is home!

After keeping us waiting for nearly two whole days, three of our volunteers, Terry, Mary and Glenys were able to confirm what we thought when we finally were able to read KL’s leg ring.  KL was ringed on 19/06/09 in Inverness-shire, she then migrated to the Sine-Saloum Delta in Senegal, where she was photographed twice by colleagues from the Rutland Osprey Project.  Last year she nested at Bassenthwaite Lake, and raised two healthy chicks, one (White 15) perished in the Western Sahara, but the other (White 14) is on the Equitorial Guinean Island of Bioko. Hopefully this year she and her mate will have another successful season

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14 Starts His Migtration

Number 14 is off !  He was over Derwentwater at 10am on Tuesday, and then continued South at a pace, and reached the Severn Valley by mid afternoon.  He crossed the Channel at the Isle of Purbrek  and probably roosted in Northern France that night. A truly epic initial journey for this young bird.  Yesterday he was West of Nates in Brittany at 15.00, and his signal last sent a reading as he was heading for the Northern end of the Bay  of Biscay.

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