Exhibition

Intimate nest experience at Whinlatter Forest – the exhibition area is closed for refurbishing February – March 2017

Live HD pictures are streamed to the osprey exhibition area, allowing a great indoor experience offering close up views of the ospreys from the edge of their nest via our live nest cameras.  The centre is fully accessible.

ExhibitionOpening Times

Although Whinlatter Forest is open all year round, the Osprey Exhibition is staffed from 10am until 5pm during the period that the ospreys are nesting (March 26th to August 31st), when Lake District Osprey Project staff will be on hand to answer questions and give information on the birds’ behaviour and other wildlife to be seen in the area.

Getting There

The Osprey Exhibition is located at Whinlatter Visitor Centre west of Keswick (CA12 5TW NY209245). There are good public transport links with the daily X4 and X5 Stagecoach bus services between Penrith and Workington calling at Keswick. The Honister Rambler Service 77 and 77A runs seasonally from Keswick to Whinlatter (Easter to October.)

From Penrith and Workington there are rail links to and from the west coast to the  mainline between Glasgow, Carlisle and London.

‘Pay on exit’ car and coach parking is available at Whinlatter.

Other Activities At Whinlatter

In addition to the Osprey exhibition,  Siskins Cafe offers delicious home made food in comfortable surroundings with great views of Grisedale Pike.

School parties are welcome. Many combine a visit to see the ospreys with a Ranger led learning session with Classrooms in the Forest.

Other facilities include a children’s play area, outdoor picnic area and the start of a number of waymarked trails around the Forest. In addition Whinlatter offers a fantastic Go Ape Course and the Lake District’s highest single track mountain bike trails . Whinlatter is fully accessible to people with reduced mobility.

If you have a comment to make about the Lake District Osprey Project, the viewpoints or the exhibition please contact Nathan Fox by email or phone 017687 78611.


Print

Recent Posts

Strange and Outstanding

One outstanding and one strange event has happened over the past 2 weeks.

The outstanding event has been the fledging of two marsh harrier chicks on the National Nature Reserve below the Dodd Wood viewpoints. It is a unique event as marsh harriers have not bred in Cumbria for over a hundred years. In most summers we have seen single birds that have stayed just for a few days and assumed that there was not enough reed bed to attract them to become more resident However, this year has seen a pair hunting throughout the season over the marsh, hunting the swathes of reed canary grass and passing food in courtship air dances.Last Sunday week we were overjoyed to see not one but two dark brown fledglings, with their characteristic cinnamon heads fluttering out of the grass. As their favourite perches are the lines of fence posts they are easily visible through the telescopes and have provided us with hours of interest. It is likely that the recent rise in numbers of the marsh harrier have encouraged pairs to explore more marginal sites but it is not sure fire that they will return to Bassenthwaite next year as marsh harriers may change partner and nest site each season.

The strange incident concerned another pair of ospreys that visited our nest, also on Sunday, All 3 of our chicks landed on the nest in a great state of agitation, screaming,  flattening their bodies and shaking their wings. Suddenly an adult bird flew in with a half eaten perch. One of the chicks leapt forward and grabbed at it, but in the general upset managed to catch hold of the bird’s talon and then grimly hung on to it. This gave us a chance to see that it was not Unring, our own adult, but a blue ringed male. After a short tussle our chick, realising his mistake, let go of the toe and grabbed the fish. At the same time,  landing on the nest, was yet another stranger bird, this time a  rather small looking female with no ring.

On replaying the film footage we found that the ring read 2H. This we discovered was a Kielder Forest bird, hatched in 2012.It had been seen at Kielder on return from its migration  in 2014 and 2015. It is likely that he and his partner failed to breed successfully this year and were attracted to the very successful nest on Bassenthwaite. It appears trying to feed unrelated chicks  is not an unusual occurance in these circumstances but undoubtedly a first for here.

 

 

  1. The Names of the Games Leave a reply
  2. Circuits and splashes Leave a reply
  3. Last flier Leave a reply
  4. Who goes next? Leave a reply
  5. A first day’s flight Leave a reply
  6. U8 Fledges Leave a reply
  7. Nearly airbourne Leave a reply
  8. Join in with the Work-out. Leave a reply
  9. Ringing – Sub-culture. Leave a reply