About Us

About The Project

The Lake District Osprey Project is a partnership between the Forestry Commission, Lake District National Park and Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) with fantastic support from many volunteers. The partnership aims to ensure the continued success of breeding ospreys at Bassenthwaite; to assist with natural colonisation elsewhere in the Lakes; and to provide visitors to the Lakes with the opportunity to see and find out more about ospreys and other wildlife sharing their habitat.

Ospreys Return to Cumbria

The return of ospreys to Bassenthwaite Lake in 2001 was the culmination of several years hard work behind the scenes to encourage them to breed. As sightings of birds on migration increased in the late 90s, so did the thought that one day these birds might breed once again. It was with this aim in mind that the Lake District Osprey Project partners built a nest platform in Wythop Woods overlooking Bassenthwaite Lake.

In 2001, all the hard work paid off and amid great excitement a pair of ospreys took to the platform and nested, successfully rearing one chick. For the first time in over 150 years, and as a result of natural re-colonisation, ospreys had been recorded nesting successfully in the Lake District!

The ospreys have returned every year since, swapping to a different nest site in Dodd Wood and then to one on the valley floor. They have successfully raised at least one chick and often two chicks each year.

Funding

Currently, the project is funded by visitor donations, and support from the Nurture Lakeland, but operates at a loss which is shared by the Forestry Commission, RSPB and Lake District National Park .

If you would like to discuss ways in which you could help in the funding of the project, please contact Nathan Fox.

The project would like to thank the BBC, Viking Optical, and the Tourism and Conservation Partnership for their continued support.

Impacts and Achievements

In June 2008 the achievements and impacts of the Lake District Osprey Project were reviewed by Natural Economy Northwest in a Case Study. In summary the study found the following key achievements.

  • Re colonisation of Lake District habitat by rare species.
  • Raised awareness of wildlife and bio diversity.
  • Increased environmental tourism: more than 500,000 visitors to that date.
  • New employment in bio diversity and in tourism industry.
  • Increased economic activity to sustain rural communities.
  • Improved public transport, reducing car travel.

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Recent Posts

Big Earth Bumble Queens and Cool Osprey Princesses

 

 

Bombus terrestris – Big Earth Bumble bees

Anorak, windcheater, parka, duffle, – we have seen every sort of jacket to keep out the wind on Dodd this last week, and have found ourselves having sad anorak conversations on which brands are most effective. However, as is usual with man made inventions, nature has already done it better. Bumble bees have their own unique brand of covering, in their thick furry coats, which enable them to be one of the first insects to come out of hibernation in Spring and survive the vagaries of changeable weather.

Queen bees that have overwintered underground, are out foraging for pollen and nectar in the early flowers. The biggest are the Buff- tailed bumblebees, Bombus Terrestris. They rumble past, like Hercules planes of the insect world transporting food for their hungry brood of bee larvae. Soon these will pupate and hatch out as worker bees, ready to continue their life cycles, vital in symbiotic relationship with the flowers they will pollinate. There are 26 species of bumble bee in the British Isles – follow the link to find out more   https://friendsoftheearth.uk/bee-count/how-identify-bumblebees

The bee above was making its way back to a cosy mouse-hole in the bank late last Monday evening.

Since then the weather has warmed up and so intermittently, has our ospreys’ love life – when a female bird appears there is a lot of mating but it’s all  still very unsettled as far as commitment and choice of nest site goes

  1. Love in a Cold Clime Leave a reply
  2. The fickleness of females Leave a reply
  3. Spring flowers – pretty faces Leave a reply
  4. Number 14 Touches Down Leave a reply
  5. North France for 14, New woman for Unring. Leave a reply
  6. Ospreywatch Opens – Unring Arrives! Leave a reply
  7. No 14 and his GPS Tracker still going strong! Leave a reply
  8. No 14 Sahara Crossing Leave a reply
  9. Preparations Leave a reply