Ospreys

Ospreys are Spectacular fish-eating birds of prey with a wingspan of nearly five feet. Find out more about Ospreys with our Osprey Fact File or check out the BBC’s Osprey web page.

Other Cumbrian bred Ospreys

As osprey numbers rise we can expect to see an increase in the number of pairs in Cumbria, although this is a slow process as only about 3 in 10 naturally survive to adult hood.

For the last 5 years YW, our 2008 male chick, has bred  successfully at Fowlshaw Moss, with broods of healthy chicks.

Another of our male chicks has been breeding in South Scotland for a number of years.

In 2010, one of the Bassenthwaite chicks from 2007 bred with another un-marked Osprey and laid eggs in South Cumbria but unfortunately none of the eggs hatched, not unusual for young inexperienced Osprey pairs. The pair were later seen on the coast nest building in late Summer, which is known as frustration behaviour, and often occurs after an unsuccessful breeding season.

An Osprey believed to be another Bassenthwaite chick from  2007 was seen regularly around the Thirlmere area during 2010 but since then there have been no sightings.

Osprey nestOther Great Places to See Ospreys

Cumbrian Ospreys History

In 2001 a pair of ospreys nested beside Bassenthwaite Lake and became the first wild osprey to breed in the Lake District for over 150 years.

The birds were encouraged to stay with the help of a purpose built nest provided by the Forestry Commission and the Lake District National Park. This was the culmination of several years of hard work. Ospreys had been summering in the Lake District since the mid 1990’s and in 2001 they started breeding, immediately adding sticks to the nest.

Once the eggs were laid, wardens kept a round the clock watch to prevent disturbance and deter egg thieves. Ospreys usually lay three eggs, which take about six weeks to hatch. The young stay in the nest for seven or eight weeks. In late summer, the adult female will migrate south, leaving the male to feed the youngsters until they master the art of fishing.

Bassenthwaite Lake is a National Nature Reserve, owned and managed by the Lake District National Park. Most of the surrounding woodland is managed by the Forestry Commission and provides valuable habitats for wildlife.

Threats

Although in the UK the osprey population doubled during the 1990s, and has steadily increased since then, with perhaps 300+ pairs now in the UK, ospreys remain the fourth rarest bird of prey in the UK. Their eggs are still at risk of being stolen by collectors and they are easily disturbed by human presence. If water quality deteriorates, a reduction in fish could have a dramatic effect on the number of young birds raised. Finally, as ospreys migrate, they are vulnerable to habitat changes across southern Europe and Africa, and risk being shot by hunters.


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Skimming over Sardinia

2020 Migration No 14   Sardinia

Suddenly, the map changes from Khaki to Indigo and Viridian; from colours of death and dehydration to the colours of life and good fishing.

No 14 has had a couple of nights of respite in Tunisia  and then made a very early start on the morning, Sat 28th March 2020, to get him across the 132 miles of the Mediterranean, sensibly island hopping to Sardinia. He arrived at 06.00 travelling at about 30kph at an altitude of 505 metres. (the first red dot on the Sardinia map.) Close to Lake /Largo de Malargia

Economic development of a country is usually detrimental to its wildlife but in Sardinia the advent of tourists has been most beneficial for passing ospreys. Previously this rocky island had only one large lake. This gave the authorities a challenge to find enough water for visitors to squander on drink, showers, and toilets. The result is a series of 57 dams, often with hydroelectric associated.

For example the Lago de Coghinos, dam, combines utility with a relatively new ‘green’ feature to help eels move up and down .

https://www.enelgreenpower.com/stories/a/2017/03/the-eel-friendly-dam

At 09.00am, at the second red dot, No 14 was flying at an elevation of 1,260 metres just below the highest point of the island, the mountain Punta la Marmora 1,834 m.  and he will have passed over Lake Coghinos soon after that- watch out eels!

A comparable program in the Lake District can be seen in the Ennerdale Valley with the efforts being made to re-instate the Arctic char and provide a way upstream to their gravel spawning grounds. From a handful of fish left in the early 2000’s their numbers have risen to over 300.

This 2014 video tells the first part of the story and features our own Wild Ennerdale Forestry Ranger, Gareth Browning. Hurray!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GUGyi-ShrxY&feature=emb_err_watch_on_yt

It’s got to be, Sardines for tea.

No14 may be lucky and pick up an energy rich sardine by the coast this evening but they are generally found closer to the surface of the water, eating plankton in the warmer months.

Interestingly, sardines do not feature in the Sardinian’s top ten traditional cookery recipes. In the past the people were too busy avoiding the waves of Romans, Vandals, Byzantines, Barbarians, Saracens, Aragonese, Spanish, and Austrians, to live anywhere near their coasts.

However, try this for a taste of the Med. with a couple of tins of sardines from the cupboard.

  • Mix in a bowl – some oil from 2 tins of sardines with 1 minced garlic clove, 1 small chopped and fried onion, 1 tsp French mustard, 1/2 lemon juice, 1 tbs oregano/marjoram/sage/parsley – whatever’s growing. Pinch paprika, .
  • Place the sardines on a tray and roll/cover with mixture.
  • Cook in a 200C oven until sizzling.
  • Eat with new potatoes and roast fennel.

Ennerdale Water from the Dam

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